Brexit in numbers: How did Parliament vote on Thursday?

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LONDON (March 14): British lawmakers are voting on Thursday on a Government proposal setting out what Prime Minister Theresa May says are the options on how long to delay Brexit.

Voting began at 1700 GMT. Below are the results so far:

AMENDMENT H: SECOND REFERENDUM -— REJECTED 334 TO 85

Led by Independent Group lawmaker Sarah Wollaston, this amendment would have instructed the government to request a delay to Brexit to allow time to hold a second referendum.

AMENDMENT TO AMENDMENT I — REJECTED 314 to 311

A technical change to add a time limit to Amendment I which seeks to pave the way for indicative votes in parliament on Brexit options.

STILL TO COME:

AMENDMENT I: FIND ANOTHER WAY

Led by lawmaker Hilary Benn, a cross-party group have put forward a proposal which would take control of the parliamentary agenda on March 20 with the aim of forcing a discussion of Brexit options at a later date.

This process, which would overturn the usual rule that the government controls what is discussed in parliament, is aimed at trying to find a majority for an alternative Brexit path that would break the parliamentary deadlock.

AMENDMENT E: DIFFERENT APPROACH

Jeremy Corbyn's opposition Labour Party has submitted an amendment calling for May to use a Brexit delay to give parliament time "to find a majority for a different approach".

AMENDMENT J: NO MORE BREXIT VOTES

This amendment, submitted by Labour lawmaker Chris Bryant, seeks to prohibit the government from asking parliament to vote on May's exit deal for a third time, citing parliamentary convention that the same question should not be asked of lawmakers more than once.

GOVERNMENT MOTION -

This will form the basis of the debate and says three things:

1) Notes parliament has rejected May's deal and a no-deal scenario, and agrees the government will seek an extension to the Brexit negotiating period, which currently ends on March 29.

2) Parliament agrees that if lawmakers approve a divorce deal by March 20, the government will seek to agree "a one-off extension" until June 30 to pass legislation needed to smooth Britain's departure from the EU.

3) Parliament notes if it has not approved a divorce deal by March 20, then it is "highly likely that the European Council at its meeting the following day would require a clear purpose for any extension, not least to determine its length, and that any extension beyond 30 June 2019 would require the United Kingdom to hold European Parliament elections in May 2019".