Anti-vaxxers will not enjoy same freedom as fully vaccinated, Dewan Negara told

Khairy: The government did not make it hard for them (anti-vaccine groups), but it was their choice that made it difficult for them, they refused to listen to scientific arguments and this has resulted in them not being able to enjoy the freedom like the people who have been vaccinated. (Photo by Zahid Izzani Mohd Said/The Edge)

Khairy: The government did not make it hard for them (anti-vaccine groups), but it was their choice that made it difficult for them, they refused to listen to scientific arguments and this has resulted in them not being able to enjoy the freedom like the people who have been vaccinated. (Photo by Zahid Izzani Mohd Said/The Edge)

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KUALA LUMPUR (Oct 21): The Ministry of Health (MoH) has taken the approach of not allowing anti-vaccine groups to enjoy certain freedoms given to fully vaccinated individuals, the Dewan Negara was told on Thursday.

Health Minister Khairy Jamaluddin said the restricted freedom was only aimed at those who refused to receive the Covid-19 vaccination.

He said there were two groups that should be differentiated, namely those who are unable to receive vaccinations due to health problems and those who refused to get vaccinated.

"The government did not make it hard for them (anti-vaccine groups), but it was their choice that made it difficult for them, they refused to listen to scientific arguments and this has resulted in them not being able to enjoy the freedom like the people who have been vaccinated.

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"We will continue with this approach. I encourage restrictions at sector level like the civil service, private sector and others before we look at a holistic approach like making it legally mandatory for the people to be vaccinated," he said when winding up the debate on the 12th Malaysia Plan (12MP).

Therefore, Khairy hoped that with the restrictions, it would be more prudent than using laws to force the group to take vaccines.

"More than 95% of the Malaysian adult population has at least received the first dose (of the vaccine), meaning the number who refuse to receive the vaccine is very small, however we will continue to persuade them to get vaccinated," he said.

Meanwhile, on the proposal for a special vaccination card for the Orang Asli community, Khairy said there was no need for it because the existing vaccination card was a proof that they have been fully vaccinated against Covid-19.

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