Cars: Hauling a Christmas tree in a Ferrari is totally normal

This article first appeared in The Edge Financial Daily, on December 28, 2017.

The GTC4Lusso has spacious seating for four, a large trunk and 680-horsepower performance on par with anything from Lamborghini and McLaren. Photos by Bloomberg

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Don’t ever let anyone tell you the GTC4Lusso isn’t a “real” Ferrari. The Ferrari GTC4Lusso is a special car.

The four-seat hatchback combines sophisticated all-wheel-drive systems with spacious seating for four, a large trunk and 680-horsepower performance on par with anything from Lamborghini and McLaren. This oddball hatchback can do zero to 62 miles per hour (mph) in 3.4 seconds; its top speed is 208 mph. It’s the type of car where you look down and realise you’ve been doing 115 mph for the past five miles without knowing it. (Yes, that happened to me.)

I wrote about it when it first came out last year, as a follow-up piece to the famous Ferrari FF, and when Ferrari introduced the 2018 turbocharged version.

I also took it out of New York City for two hours to get a Christmas tree. Really.

Because why not? Compared with many other cars at nearly US$300,000 (RM1,227,000) or more it’ll take to buy a GTC4Lusso, this is a shockingly drivable contraption.

That elaborate traction and stability apparatus is called “thrust-vectoring” and smooths out the car’s response to unstable conditions such as snow and ice.

Even better, it also has the advantage of something very simple and immensely helpful when you’re lugging around Christmas trees on upstate farms: ride height. It’s higher off the ground than a standard sports car, making it far less finicky over city pot holes and torn-up streets.

Inside, the car feels like a very luxurious cockpit. Which makes sense — after all, the word “Lusso” means luxury in Italian.

The front passenger seat even has a computerised and interactive light-emitting diode screen that creates a second cockpit all on its own.

Ferrari calls the new invention a “dual cockpit” configuration — it’s divided by a central console where all the car’s comfort and entertainment controls are shared between the driver and the passenger.

It makes sense. Nice things are meant to be shared, right? — Bloomberg